With the values my mother instilled in me during my upbringing, I can’t stand by and watch what’s happening to Oregon. Being helpful is the way I was raised, like the time my mom looked at my friend Bill and realized he wasn’t getting the care he needed. When I look at Oregon right now, especially the 2nd District, what I see reminds me of a neglected child.

 

I have so many ideas for our future. It’s true, we have a lot of challenges to address, challenges such as…

  • updating our infrastructure
  • improving public transportation
  • boosting business opportunities, and with that, jobs and wages
  • fixing our broken healthcare system and making it available to everyone
  • putting a focus back on public education and restoring funding to fully support it
  • taking care of our veterans and their families
  • supporting Oregon farmers and agriculture
  • solving the problems of homelessness and affordable housing
  • working with sustainable, green energy solutions wherever possible

 

It sounds like a lot to accomplish, and of course, it’s not a comprehensive list, but what if, instead of looking at each of these challenges individually, we recognized how interconnected they are and how well-thought-out solutions power each other one-to-the-next?

 

Let’s start with infrastructure and public transportation. Top of mind are roads, bridges, and highways, but instead of depending on the highway department to contract the work out, let’s create local jobs that help Oregonians right here in the 2nd District get back to work. We also need new railways. Specifically, it’s time for a green-powered, high-speed train running north and south between our Washington and California borders. If we cooperated with our border states, I foresee a coastal rail line superior to anything else in the U.S. And once again, we make sure we’re putting local Oregonians to work to help build it. We would need as many as three additional routes connecting east to west as well. Imagine how many jobs we could create, and if we properly advocate for public transportation, we’ll enjoy a second wave of business and job-creation in the form of increased demand for supplemental transportation and other travelers’ needs at every rail station. Think more bus routes, hotels and restaurants, convenience stores and increased demand for ride services like Uber and Lyft.

 

The first question I often get about this idea is, “How would we pay for it?” I have a novel approach to that as well. As I’ve mentioned before, part of what I plan to do in Washington D.C. is fight for Oregon to receive our fair share of tax-payer dollars. However, it’s not just federal money I envision for this project. I have a much more dynamic partnership in mind – the United States Post Office. Let’s give one (or more) cars on every train for use by the USPS. What would they be willing to invest for this enhancement to their services? And if successful, this would also take quite a few of their larger delivery trucks off our highways, decreasing both air pollution and roadway wear-and-tear. Now, we’re getting greener while we’re creating jobs and becoming a flagship in the western United States for bringing our infrastructure and transportation into the 21st century.

 

It’s this kind of dynamic and integrated problem-solving I have in mind for so many of the challenges Oregon is facing right now. We don’t need to do more with less, and we don’t even need to work harder. As my father often said, we need to work smarter, and we need people in Congress who’ll step up and demand we receive our fair share from the federal government. I’m not only dedicated to all of this; I’m excited about it. If you are too, then I hope I can count on your vote in November.

 

 

With the values my mother instilled in me during my upbringing, I can’t stand by and watch what’s happening to Oregon. Being helpful is the way I was raised, like the time my mom looked at my friend Bill and realized he wasn’t getting the care he needed. When I look at Oregon right now, especially the 2nd District, what I see reminds me of a neglected child.

 

I have so many ideas for our future. It’s true, we have a lot of challenges to address, challenges such as…

  • updating our infrastructure
  • improving public transportation
  • boosting business opportunities, and with that, jobs and wages
  • fixing our broken healthcare system and making it available to everyone
  • putting a focus back on public education and restoring funding to fully support it
  • taking care of our veterans and their families
  • supporting Oregon farmers and agriculture
  • solving the problems of homelessness and affordable housing
  • working with sustainable, green energy solutions wherever possible

 

It sounds like a lot to accomplish, and of course, it’s not a comprehensive list, but what if, instead of looking at each of these challenges individually, we recognized how interconnected they are and how well-thought-out solutions power each other one-to-the-next?

 

Let’s start with infrastructure and public transportation. Top of mind are roads, bridges, and highways, but instead of depending on the highway department to contract the work out, let’s create local jobs that help Oregonians right here in the 2nd District get back to work. We also need new railways. Specifically, it’s time for a green-powered, high-speed train running north and south between our Washington and California borders. If we cooperated with our border states, I foresee a coastal rail line superior to anything else in the U.S. And once again, we make sure we’re putting local Oregonians to work to help build it. We would need as many as three additional routes connecting east to west as well. Imagine how many jobs we could create, and if we properly advocate for public transportation, we’ll enjoy a second wave of business and job-creation in the form of increased demand for supplemental transportation and other travelers’ needs at every rail station. Think more bus routes, hotels and restaurants, convenience stores and increased demand for ride services like Uber and Lyft.

 

The first question I often get about this idea is, “How would we pay for it?” I have a novel approach to that as well. As I’ve mentioned before, part of what I plan to do in Washington D.C. is fight for Oregon to receive our fair share of tax-payer dollars. However, it’s not just federal money I envision for this project. I have a much more dynamic partnership in mind – the United States Post Office. Let’s give one (or more) cars on every train for use by the USPS. What would they be willing to invest for this enhancement to their services? And if successful, this would also take quite a few of their larger delivery trucks off our highways, decreasing both air pollution and roadway wear-and-tear. Now, we’re getting greener while we’re creating jobs and becoming a flagship in the western United States for bringing our infrastructure and transportation into the 21st century.

 

It’s this kind of dynamic and integrated problem-solving I have in mind for so many of the challenges Oregon is facing right now. We don’t need to do more with less, and we don’t even need to work harder. As my father often said, we need to work smarter, and we need people in Congress who’ll step up and demand we receive our fair share from the federal government. I’m not only dedicated to all of this; I’m excited about it. If you are too, then I hope I can count on your vote in November.