In my last post, I laid out several of the challenges facing Oregon and its 2nd District. I demonstrated how updating our state infrastructure and adding a green-powered, high-speed rail system tied in with boosting opportunities for new businesses, new jobs, higher wages and reducing wear-and-tear on our highways.

 

But the advantages don’t stop there. High-speed railways give us all a lot more options for choosing physicians and accessing specialists. When I hear about doctors in our state turning away Medicare patients, it shines a harsh light on one of the many ways our healthcare system is broken. But now imagine patients in previously underserved areas suddenly have a way to get to appointments in other parts of the state. Once patients have more choices, doctors become the ones needing to compete.

 

Speaking of healthcare, I do favor a Medicare-for-all approach. Giving people more options for choosing the right physician or specialist works right along those same lines. If Medicare-for-all doesn’t pan out, it’s still possible to work toward a system much closer to single-payer, which, when paired with other healthcare reforms (such as capping prescription drug and medical equipment pricing) spells lower costs for healthcare facilities, physicians and patients alike.

 

Something I haven’t touched on yet, but feel no less strongly about, is improving both quality and access to mental health care in our state which currently rates one of the most underserved in the country. Some of our most vulnerable populations including veterans, seniors, the LGBTQ community, and current and former addicts of drugs and alcohol struggle every day in our state to find quality, affordable mental healthcare. Right now, so many of our fellow Oregonians are slipping through the cracks in our system, a system badly in need of more resources. We also need more doctors and therapists not just coming in, but choosing to stay. In that same vein, we should be increasing scholarships and grant monies available for students to pursue a career in mental health.

 

With Medicare-for-all or a single-payer system that includes mental healthcare, all of the vulnerable populations I mentioned above will finally be able to afford the treatment they need. When people can afford care, they’re far more likely to access it. This means therapists and physicians in this branch of the medical community will be able to fill their practices with paying patients which is the key to keeping them practicing in our state. Statistics point to communities with excellent, accessible mental healthcare reducing their homeless and prison populations, freeing up tax-payer dollars to address other concerns.

 

I’ve mentioned veterans a few times, and it’s not only better healthcare I want for them. While I never served in the armed forces myself, I have the utmost respect for those who do. In addition to the veterans themselves, their families pay a dear price for their loved ones’ service as well, and should be treated accordingly. Our country’s record of caring for veterans and venteran families is dismal at this point, and these are the very people who put everything on the line for us. It’s shameful, and I won’t stand for it. I don’t think I’m alone in feeling this way. Put me in office, and I’ll fight for veterans to get more than just excellent healthcare. I want them to be able to access assistance for housing, higher education, job training and anything else their families need to lead comfortable productive lives. And they shouldn’t have to jump through hoops or endure long waits for what’s been promised to them. These are our nation’s heroes, and we’ve been failing them for too long. They deserve better.

 

By now, I hope the ways all these solutions work together is coming into focus. It’s a lot to take in, and I want to make sure everything makes sense along the way. I know Oregonians in the 2nd District have had to make do with less for a long time. It’s made a lot of us thrifty and very wise with our time, energy and savings. Tapping into the ways that all these solutions fuel one another is the smartest way to actually save time, energy, money, and even the environment, all while saving Oregon at the same time.

 

In my last post, I laid out several of the challenges facing Oregon and its 2nd District. I demonstrated how updating our state infrastructure and adding a green-powered, high-speed rail system tied in with boosting opportunities for new businesses, new jobs, higher wages and reducing wear-and-tear on our highways.

 

But the advantages don’t stop there. High-speed railways give us all a lot more options for choosing physicians and accessing specialists. When I hear about doctors in our state turning away Medicare patients, it shines a harsh light on one of the many ways our healthcare system is broken. But now imagine patients in previously underserved areas suddenly have a way to get to appointments in other parts of the state. Once patients have more choices, doctors become the ones needing to compete.

 

Speaking of healthcare, I do favor a Medicare-for-all approach. Giving people more options for choosing the right physician or specialist works right along those same lines. If Medicare-for-all doesn’t pan out, it’s still possible to work toward a system much closer to single-payer, which, when paired with other healthcare reforms (such as capping prescription drug and medical equipment pricing) spells lower costs for healthcare facilities, physicians and patients alike.

 

Something I haven’t touched on yet, but feel no less strongly about, is improving both quality and access to mental health care in our state which currently rates one of the most underserved in the country. Some of our most vulnerable populations including veterans, seniors, the LGBTQ community, and current and former addicts of drugs and alcohol struggle every day in our state to find quality, affordable mental healthcare. Right now, so many of our fellow Oregonians are slipping through the cracks in our system, a system badly in need of more resources. We also need more doctors and therapists not just coming in, but choosing to stay. In that same vein, we should be increasing scholarships and grant monies available for students to pursue a career in mental health.

 

With Medicare-for-all or a single-payer system that includes mental healthcare, all of the vulnerable populations I mentioned above will finally be able to afford the treatment they need. When people can afford care, they’re far more likely to access it. This means therapists and physicians in this branch of the medical community will be able to fill their practices with paying patients which is the key to keeping them practicing in our state. Statistics point to communities with excellent, accessible mental healthcare reducing their homeless and prison populations, freeing up tax-payer dollars to address other concerns.

 

I’ve mentioned veterans a few times, and it’s not only better healthcare I want for them. While I never served in the armed forces myself, I have the utmost respect for those who do. In addition to the veterans themselves, their families pay a dear price for their loved ones’ service as well, and should be treated accordingly. Our country’s record of caring for veterans and venteran families is dismal at this point, and these are the very people who put everything on the line for us. It’s shameful, and I won’t stand for it. I don’t think I’m alone in feeling this way. Put me in office, and I’ll fight for veterans to get more than just excellent healthcare. I want them to be able to access assistance for housing, higher education, job training and anything else their families need to lead comfortable productive lives. And they shouldn’t have to jump through hoops or endure long waits for what’s been promised to them. These are our nation’s heroes, and we’ve been failing them for too long. They deserve better.

 

By now, I hope the ways all these solutions work together is coming into focus. It’s a lot to take in, and I want to make sure everything makes sense along the way. I know Oregonians in the 2nd District have had to make do with less for a long time. It’s made a lot of us thrifty and very wise with our time, energy and savings. Tapping into the ways that all these solutions fuel one another is the smartest way to actually save time, energy, money, and even the environment, all while saving Oregon at the same time.